Linux Tactic

Save Disk Space and Stay Organized: Install Packages in a Specific Directory

Installing Packages in a Specific Directory: A Comprehensive Guide

Are you running out of disk space but still need to install more software? Or do you want to keep your temporary folders clean and organized?

Whatever your reason, installing packages in a specific directory can help you save precious disk space and keep things organized. In this article, we will explore how to install packages in a specific directory using Yum or DNF package managers.

We will also provide an example of how to install Git in a temporary directory and verify its installation. Yum vs.

DNF Package Manager

Yum and DNF are both popular package managers in the Linux world. Yum was the default package manager for many years before it was replaced by DNF in Fedora 22.

Despite being the older of the two, Yum is still widely used and supported by many Linux distributions. However, DNF is considered to be more advanced and modern than Yum, with features like parallel downloading, support for modular repositories, and better dependency resolution.

Whether you choose Yum or DNF is up to you, as both can be used to install packages in a specific directory.

Benefits of Installing Packages in a Specific Directory

When you install software using the default settings, it is usually installed in locations like /usr/bin, /usr/lib, or /usr/share. These locations are shared by many packages and can quickly become crowded, resulting in disk space shortages.

By installing packages in a specific directory, you can keep your disk space clean and organized, as well as make it easier to manage the software you install. In addition, if you need to install software temporarily, installing it in a specific directory can help you keep your temporary folders clean and prevent them from cluttering your system.

Steps to Install a Package in a Specific Directory Using Yum or DNF

To install packages in a specific directory using Yum or DNF, you need to use the installroot option. The installroot option tells the package manager where to install the packages instead of the default location.

However, there are some caveats to using this option, as some packages may not work properly if they are not installed in the default location. Here are the steps to install a package in a specific directory:

1.

Create a temporary directory for the package installation. You can create a temporary directory by using the mkdir command, such as mkdir temp-packages.

2. Use the installroot option to install the package in the temporary directory.

For Yum, you can use the installroot option followed by the directory path. For DNF, you can use the –installroot option followed by the directory path.

3. Use the releasever option to specify the version of the package.

This option is necessary because Yum and DNF use the default system releasever when installing packages. Using the releasever option ensures that the correct dependencies are installed for the specific version of the package.

4. Install the package using the package name or package file path.

For example, to install the Git package using Yum in the temp-packages directory and for Fedora 34, you would run the command yum –installroot=/path/to/temp-packages –releasever=34 install git. Example: Installing Git in a Specific Directory

Now that you know how to install a package in a specific directory using Yum or DNF, let’s take a look at an example of how to install Git in a temporary directory using Yum.

1. Create a temporary directory for Git installation.

You can create a directory in the /opt directory, such as mkdir /opt/temp-git. 2.

Use the Yum installroot option to install Git in the temporary directory. Run the command yum –installroot=/opt/temp-git –releasever=34 install git.

This will install the Git package in the /opt/temp-git directory. 3.

Verify the installation and usage of Git from the specific directory. You can check whether Git was installed properly by navigating to the /opt/temp-git/usr/bin directory and using the ls command to list the contents of the directory.

You should see the git executable file. You can also use the grep command to search for Git in the installed files, such as grep -r “git” /.

Finally, you can run the Git command in the /opt/temp-git/usr/bin directory by using the ./git command, which should show the version of Git installed.

Conclusion

In this article, we discussed the benefits of installing packages in a specific directory, how to install packages in a specific directory using Yum or DNF, and provided an example of how to install Git in a temporary directory. By using the installroot option, you can keep your disk space clean and organized, as well as make it easier to manage the software you install.

However, be mindful of the caveats of using this option, as some packages may not work correctly if they are not installed in the default location. In this article, we discussed the benefits of installing packages in a specific directory and provided a comprehensive guide to installing packages in a specific directory using Yum or DNF.

By installing packages in a specific directory, you can save disk space, keep temporary folders organized, and make it easier to manage the software you install. It’s essential to use caution when using the installroot option, as some packages may not function correctly if they are not installed in the default location.

Nonetheless, using the installroot option can help with troubleshooting and provide flexibility in managing your system.

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