Linux Tactic

Mastering the ps Command: Analyzing Linux Processes in Detail

Linux is a powerful operating system that is commonly used by programmers and system administrators. One of its advantages is the ability to manage running processes with the use of the “ps” command.

In this article, we will discuss the usage of the ps ef command, the standard format of the ps command, and compare it to the simple ps command.

Usage of ps ef Command in Linux

The ps command is a built-in command in Linux that allows us to display running processes. By default, the output format of the ps command is limited, but the ps ef command can display more detailed information about the running processes.

The primary purpose of the ps ef command is to provide a standard format that displays the running processes in a more detailed and comprehensive manner. With this command, users can easily identify and analyze the performance of their system’s processes.

In a nutshell, it lets you view detailed information about running processes such as process IDs, CPU usage, memory usage, and command names. Using ps ef Command on Linux Mint 20.3

To execute the ps ef command on Linux Mint 20.3, open the terminal and type “ps ef” followed by “enter”.

The command will display the list of running processes with the related information in the standard format. The ps ef command allows users to display processes in different formats.

For example, the “-e” option lists all processes, while the “-f” option displays full format listing. You can use any combination of options to customize your output as per your requirements.

Standard Format of ps Command

By using the standard format of the ps command, users can display and filter running processes as per their need. The standard format displays relevant information such as process ID, the terminal in which the process runs, the command that initiated the process, and the processor usage of the process.

The standard format is flexible, and you can use several formatting options to modify the output format. For example, the “-U” option will display user-oriented output, while the “-u” option will display the user name and its corresponding information.

Comparison with Simple ps Command

The main difference between the standard and simple ps commands is the level of output format customizability. The simple ps command displays only basic information about the running processes, while the standard format provides a more comprehensive and detailed report.

When using the simple ps command, users can modify the output by using specific options. However, this command has limited output formats and less flexibility in manipulating the output of running processes.

Another disadvantage of the simple ps command is that it does not display valuable information such as CPU and memory usage, which can help to analyze the performance of the running processes.

Conclusion

In conclusion, the ps command in Linux is a powerful tool for managing running processes on the system. The usage of the ps ef command provides a standard format that displays detailed information about running processes.

The standard format of the ps command is also flexible and highly customizable, allowing users to filter and manipulate the output as per their requirements. In comparison, the simple ps command is limited in its formatting output and does not provide enough details to help users manage resources effectively.

By understanding the usage of both the ps command and ps ef command, users can better analyze their system’s performance and improve their productivity. Tutorial: Using the ps ef Command on Linux Mint 20.3

In this tutorial, we will cover in detail the usage of the ps ef command in Linux Mint 20.3. The ps ef command is a powerful tool that allows users to view detailed information about running processes on their Linux system.

With this command, users can easily identify processes that are consuming too many resources and make adjustments as needed to improve system performance.

Step 1: Opening the Terminal

To use the ps ef command, you must first open the terminal.

In Linux Mint 20.3, you can open the terminal by clicking on the icon in the taskbar or by pressing Ctrl + Alt + T on your keyboard. Step 2: Typing the Command

Once the terminal is open, type the ps ef command, followed by enter.

The terminal will display a list of running processes on your system in the standard format. The standard format provides detailed information about each process such as the process ID, CPU usage, memory usage, and command name.

Step 3: Customizing the Output

The ps ef command can be customized to display the output in different formats by adding options to the command. For example, you can use the “-e” option to display all processes, or the “-u” option to display processes for a specific user.

The “-f” option can be used to display the full format listing of processes. To customize the output, simply add the desired option to the end of the ps ef command, for example:

ps ef -e

This command displays all processes running on the system. You can combine multiple options to create more complex output formats, for instance:

ps ef -e –sort=-%cpu

This command will display all running processes sorted by highest CPU usage percentage. Step 4: Filtering the Output

To filter the output of the ps ef command, you can use the grep command.

The grep command allows you to search for specific strings in the output. For example, you can filter the output to display only processes that contain the string “firefox” by typing:

ps ef | grep firefox

This will display only the processes that contain the string “firefox” in their command names.

Step 5: Killing Processes

The ps ef command can also be used to kill running processes that are consuming too many system resources. To kill a process, you must first identify its process ID.

Once you have the process ID, you can use the “kill” command to terminate the process.

To find the process ID, use the ps ef command to display the list of running processes.

Once you have identified the process that you want to kill, note its process ID. For example, if the process ID is 1234, you would type:

kill 1234

The “kill” command will terminate the process associated with the process ID you specified.

Conclusion

In conclusion, the ps ef command is a powerful tool that allows users to view and manage running processes on their Linux Mint 20.3 system. With this command, users can easily identify processes that are consuming too many resources and adjust as needed to optimize system performance.

By customizing and filtering the output, users can create more complex output formats and target specific processes. The ps ef command can also be used to kill running processes, providing users with complete control over their Linux system.

By following this tutorial, users can improve their Linux system’s performance and work more efficiently. In summary, the ps command in Linux and its ps ef option are essential tools for managing running processes, analyzing system performance, and improving productivity.

The ps ef command offers a standard format of the running processes that includes detailed information about CPU usage, memory usage, and command name, among others. Users can customize and filter the output to target specific processes, and also use it to kill running processes.

Understanding the usage of these commands is crucial for Linux users, particularly for programmers and system administrators. By following the tutorial outlined in this article, users can optimize their Linux system’s performance and work more efficiently.

It is crucial to utilize these commands effectively to improve productivity and ensure that Linux systems run smoothly.

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