Linux Tactic

Centralized User Account Management with NIS+ System

The Network Information Service Plus, also known as NIS+, is a system that enables centralized user account management for UNIX-based networks. Designed to enhance the earlier NIS system, NIS+ offers a higher level of security and reliability.

In this article, we will explore the various aspects of NIS+ that are essential for understanding its functionality. We will look at NIS+ objects, groups, and how to configure NIS+ in the server machine.

NIS+ Objects

NIS+ objects are the entities that constitute the NIS+ system. They include user passwords, usernames, network services, etc.

The following are the essential NIS+ objects:

User Passwords: User passwords are the keys to the security of any UNIX-based network. NIS+ allows central management of user passwords, making it more secure and reliable.

Usernames: Usernames are the unique aliases that identify users in a network. NIS+ enables centralized management of usernames, ensuring consistency and avoiding duplication.

Network Services: Network services include services such as file sharing, remote login, and printing. NIS+ allows network services to be centralized, making them more accessible and reliable.

Home Directories: Home directories are personal directories assigned to users for storing their files. NIS+ enables centralized management of home directories, making it easier to administer and maintain.

NIS+ Groups

NIS+ groups are hierarchical structures that enable centralization of server and client information in multiple-domain servers. NIS+ groups are used to organize tables that capture configuration information and other resource data.

Tables are the primary means of storing and managing information in NIS+. The following are some of the key features of NIS+ groups:

Hierarchical Structure: NIS+ groups are structured hierarchically, with each group having a parent and child group.

The structure allows for easy organization of data, making it more accessible and easier to maintain. Multiple-Domain Servers: NIS+ groups can be used to manage information across multiple-domain servers.

By organizing the data in tables, NIS+ groups allow information to be shared across servers seamlessly. Tables: Tables are the primary means of storing and managing information in NIS+.

They contain all kinds of data, including configuration information, network services information, etc. Configuring NIS+ in the Server Machine

Configuring NIS+ in the server machine involves several steps.

We will look at how to prepare for installation and how to install the NIS+ server.

Preparing for Installation

Preparing for NIS+ installation involves creating NIS+ maps and data files. The maps and data files are used to store client information, such as passwords, usernames, network services, and other resource data.

Once you have created the necessary maps and data files, you can proceed to install the NIS+ server. Centralized Administration: NIS+ enables centralized administration of user accounts, making it more secure and reliable.

With centralized administration, it is easier to manage large networks, avoid duplication, and ensure consistency. Installing NIS+ Server

The NIS+ server is the machine that serves client requests for information.

The following are the steps to install the NIS+ server:

Default Domain: Before installing the NIS+ server, you must determine the default domain for the network. The default domain is the domain that NIS+ will use when resolving user and machine names.

Server Initialization Program: Once you have determined the default domain, you can install the NIS+ server initialization program. The server initialization program creates the NIS+ tables and sets up the NIS+ server.

Standard Tables: The server initialization program creates standard tables, including passwd, group, and hosts. These tables store information about users, groups, and machines, respectively.

Conclusion

In conclusion, NIS+ is an essential system for managing user accounts in UNIX-based networks. It offers a higher level of security and reliability than the earlier NIS system.

NIS+ objects include user passwords, usernames, network services, and home directories. NIS+ groups are hierarchical structures used to organize tables that capture configuration information and other resource data.

Configuring NIS+ in the server machine involves creating NIS+ maps and data files and installing the NIS+ server. By centralizing information, NIS+ enables easier administration of user accounts, making it more secure and reliable.

Installing and setting up the NIS+ client is an essential process that enables clients to access NIS+ servers and authenticate or authorize users. This article will explore the process of installing and setting up the NIS+ client, including creating credentials for the client and initializing the client.

Creating Credentials for the Client

Before a client can access an NIS+ server, it must have its credentials. The following steps explain how to create client credentials for the NIS+ system:

1.

Install NIS-Tools: The first step when creating client credentials is to install the NIS-tools package. This package contains all the necessary NIS+ tools for managing NIS+ client credentials.

2. Install New Libc: After installing the NIS-tools package, you should install a new version of the libc library.

A new version of the libc library is necessary to work with the NIS+ system fully. 3.

Set Up the Time Difference: Before creating credentials, ensure that the time differences between the NIS+ server and client machines are no more than 20 seconds. 4.

Create Credentials: Once the time difference is set, you can create credentials for the NIS+ client by running the `nisclient -c` command. This command creates a new credential cache file containing the credentials for the client.

5. Copy the Keys: After creating credentials, you need to copy the keys for the client from the NIS+ server to the client machine.

This is done by using the `nispopulate` command. The command copies all the necessary keys for the client from the NIS+ server to the client machine.

Initializing the Client

After creating credentials for the client, the next step is to initialize the client. The following steps explain how to initialize the client machine:

1.

Install the Client Initialization Program: The first step when initializing the client is to install the NIS+ client initialization program available for your operating system. 2.

Configure the nsswitch.conf File: Once the installation is complete, you need to configure the nsswitch.conf file. The nsswitch.conf file is a configuration file used to determine what name services a machine should use.

In the file, set the passwd, group, and shadow entries to “nisplus”. This tells the system to use the NIS+ system for user authentication and authorization.

3. Run the Client Initialization Program: Once the nsswitch.conf file is configured, run the client initialization program.

The initialization program copies the necessary NIS+ table data from the NIS+ server to the client machine. Using the NIS+ System

Once you have successfully set up the NIS+ client, you can look up entries and authenticate and authorize users on the network.

The NIS+ system offers several benefits, including centralized user account management and improved security. With the NIS+ system, you can:

– Look up Entries: The NIS+ system enables you to look up entries in tables stored on the NIS+ server.

This feature allows users to access all necessary information, including username, password, and home directory, from anywhere on the network. – Authenticate Users: The NIS+ system’s centralized user account management enables seamless user authentication.

When a user enters their login credentials, the system checks the stored credentials in the NIS+ server, ensuring that only authorized users access the network. – Authorize Users: Authorization in the NIS+ system is based on the permission given to a user to access specific network resources.

With the NIS+ system, you can configure the access permissions for network resources centrally.

Conclusion

In conclusion, setting up the NIS+ client is necessary for clients to access NIS+ servers. Creating credentials for the client involves installing NIS-tools, installing a new version of the libc library, setting up the time difference, creating credentials, and copying the keys.

Initializing the client requires installing the client initialization program, configuring the nsswitch.conf file, and running the client initialization program. Once the client is set up, users can use the NIS+ system for looking up entries, authenticating users, and authorizing users’ access to network resources.

The NIS+ system offers centralized user account management and improved security. This article has explored the essential aspects of NIS+, including objects, groups, and configuring the system in both the server and client machines.

NIS+ offers centralized user account management, improved security, and reliable access to network resources. To set up the NIS+ client, creating credentials and initializing the system is required.

Takeaways from this article include the importance of centralized user account management, the use of NIS-tools, and the need for a new version of the libc library. The NIS+ system offers centralized user account management, improved security, and reliability.

Configuring the system in both server and client machines dramatically enhances the security and accessibility of network resources.

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