Linux Tactic

Boost Your File Transfer Efficiency: How to Enable dd Command Progress Display in Linux Mint 20

Enabling “dd” Command Progress Display in Linux Mint 20

If you have ever used the “dd” command in Linux to copy files between disk images or devices, you know how useful and powerful it can be. However, one downside to using “dd” is that it does not show any progress while copying files, making it difficult to estimate the copying time.

Fortunately, there are a couple of ways to enable progress display when using the “dd” command in Linux Mint 20. Checking if “dd” command is installed

Before we delve into the methods of enabling progress display, let’s make sure that the “dd” command is installed on your Linux system.

To do this, open a terminal window and execute the following command:

“`bash

dd –version

“`

If the command is installed, you should see its version number and other related information. If not, you need to install it using your Linux distribution’s package manager.

Method #1: Using “progress” flag to show progress

One way to enable progress display while copying files with “dd” is to use the “progress” flag. The “progress” flag is a feature that was added to the “dd” command starting from version 8.24.

It enables measuring and showing the progress of copying files in real-time. To enable the “progress” flag, execute the following command:

“`bash

dd if=/dev/zero of=/dev/null bs=1M count=1000 status=progress

“`

In this example, we’re copying 1000 blocks of 1MB each from /dev/zero to /dev/null, two special files in Linux that are used for various purposes.

The “status=progress” flag enables progress display, which shows you the current rate of data transfer, the total data size, the elapsed time, and the estimated time to completion. Method #2: Using “pv” command to show progress with “dd” command

Another way to enable progress display when copying files with “dd” is to pair it up with the “pv” command.

“pv” is a terminal-based tool that can be used to monitor the progress of data through a pipeline. It can also be used to show the progress of a single file copy or other data transfer operations.

To use “pv” together with “dd”, you need to pipe the output of “dd” into “pv”. Here’s an example command:

“`bash

dd if=/dev/zero bs=1M count=1000 | pv | dd of=/dev/null bs=1M

“`

This command will copy 1000 blocks of 1MB each from /dev/zero to /dev/null while displaying the progress in real-time.

The first “dd” command reads the data from /dev/zero, which generates an endless stream of null bytes. The output of this command is piped into “pv”, which displays the progress.

Finally, the output of “pv” is piped into the second “dd” command, which writes the data to /dev/null, a special file that discards anything written to it.

Conclusion

In conclusion, enabling progress display when using the “dd” command in Linux Mint 20 is incredibly useful when working with large files or disk images. You can use either the “progress” flag or the “pv” command to achieve this.

With these methods, you no longer have to guess how much time it will take to copy files; you can monitor the progress and estimate the completion time accurately. If you’re unsure whether the “dd” command is installed on your Linux system, you can check it using the simple command we provided.

By following the steps in this guide, anyone can enable progress display when using the “dd” command in no time!

3) Method #1: Using “progress” Flag to Show Progress of “dd” Command

The “dd” command is a powerful tool to copy files between disks and disk images in Linux. However, one of the downsides of using “dd” is that it does not provide any progress bar or mechanism to estimate the copying time.

Fortunately, starting from version 8.24, the “dd” command supports the “progress” flag that enables measuring and showing the progress of copying files in real-time. Using “progress” flag to show progress of “dd” command is a straightforward process, and it requires passing the “status=progress” flag to the “dd” command.

Here’s how to use the “progress” flag together with “dd”:

“`bash

dd if=/dev/zero of=/dev/null bs=1M count=1000 status=progress

“`

In this example, we’re copying 1000 blocks of 1MB each from /dev/zero to /dev/null, which are two special files in Linux that are used for various purposes. Then we are passing the “status=progress” flag to the “dd” command, which enables the progress display.

When you execute this command, you can see the progress bar that shows the current rate of data transfer, the total data size, the elapsed time, and the estimated time to completion. Overall, using the “progress” flag is a quick and easy way to enable progress display when copying files with “dd”.

4) Method #2: Using “pv” Command to Show Progress of “dd” Command

Another way to show the progress of “dd” command is to pair it up with the “pv” (Pipe Viewer) command. “pv” is a terminal-based tool that monitors the progress of data through a pipeline and can also show the progress of a single file copy or other data transfer operations.

To use “pv” command to show progress of “dd” command, you can pipe the output of “dd” into “pv” command as an input and then pipe the output of “pv” into another “dd” command or redirect it to a file. Here’s how:

Installing “pv” command on your Linux system:

To use “pv” command to show the progress of “dd” command, you need to install “pv” command on your Linux system.

Here’s how to install it on some popular Linux distributions:

For Debian/Ubuntu:

“`bash

sudo apt-get install pv

“`

For CentOS/RHEL:

“`bash

sudo yum install pv

“`

Using “pv” command to show progress of “dd” command:

After installing “pv” command, execute the following command to copy data from /dev/zero to /dev/null and to show the progress using “pv” command:

“`bash

dd if=/dev/zero bs=1M count=1000 | pv | dd of=/dev/null bs=1M

“`

In this example, we’re copying 1000 blocks of 1MB each from /dev/zero (a special file that provides an endless stream of null bytes) to /dev/null (a special file that discards anything written to it). The first “dd” command reads the data from /dev/zero and pipes it to the “pv” command, which monitors and displays the progress.

The output of “pv” command is piped to the second “dd” command, which writes the data to /dev/null. When you execute this command, you can see the progress bar that shows the progress of data copy operation, including the current data transfer rate, the total data size available for transfer, the elapsed time, and the estimated time remaining.

Using “pv” command along with “dd” is a powerful way to monitor and show the progress of data transfer in real-time.

Conclusion

Overall, using either the “progress” flag or “pv” command can help you estimate and monitor the progress of file copy operations using “dd” command in Linux. While “progress” flag is a built-in feature of “dd” command, “pv” command is a third-party tool that can be easily installed on your Linux system.

By following the steps mentioned in this article, you can easily enable progress display when copying files with “dd”. In conclusion, the “dd” command is a powerful tool, but it does not provide any progress indication while copying files in Linux.

However, there are two easy ways to enable progress display of “dd” command in Linux. Using the “progress” flag is a built-in feature of the “dd” command and shows the progress of copying files in real-time.

Another option is to use the “pv” command, a third-party tool that can be used to monitor and display the progress. Either way, enabling progress display can help estimate the file copy time, making file transfers easier and more efficient.

By using these methods, you can utilize the full potential of the “dd” command while keeping track of the progress of your file copy operations.

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